Kittitas County Field & Stream Club Conservation Efforts


conservation (kan' sər va' shən) n.  1. a conserving; protection from loss, waste, etc.  2. the official care and protection of natural resources.

The Club’s aims and purposes regarding recreation are inextricably linked to conservation.  Indeed, each individual has an opportunity each day to protect resources.  Recycle, pick up a piece of litter, plant a tree, rehabilitate a spring, release gamebirds, or join a conservation group.  The Kittitas County Field & Stream Club is for everyone interested in the outdoors: rafters, hikers, fishers, birders, hunters, horsemen, RVers, and relaxers.  Club members work year-round to preserve and improve recreational opportunities throughout Kittitas County.    After all, without land and wildlife, there is no outdoor recreation.


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Access Areas on Yakima River.  Regular contact with WDFW and other agencies ensures they are aware how important it is that public access sites remain on a river that is becoming more and more privatized.  When the Big Horn site in the canyon was closed due to littering and abuse, the Club and Worley Bugger Fly Shop cleaned up and monitored the site to get it reopened and to keep it that way.

Alpine Lakes Management Plan applies only to public lands, as no one perceived the threat of logging companies clear cutting on a massive scale.   The Club was a vocal opponent to the clear cutting that began in the Silver Creek area.  Our repeated suggestion to use the plan on private land did little to slow a company bent on liquidating its assets.

Angler Education.  In cooperation with WDFW and in partnership with "The Evening Hatch" fly shop, our Fish Committee is conducting a two-day course to help inexperience anglers improve their techniques.

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Beavers.  Club members install a "beaver pipe" in a dam to permit the continued flow of irrigation water.  Working with the land owner and WDFW, members insert a 6-inch pipe through a dam to maintain the beneficial pond behind the dam for habitat and allow the flow of water for irrigation.

Big Game Management Roundtable
is a non-profit group working to educate the public, research and resolve human-wildlife conflicts.  The Club was at the forefront of support to establish the group, funding an internship position to improve its work.  We continue to support the groups efforts.

Bluebird nest boxes.  Members built and installed dozens of boxes to help them thrive.

Bobwhite quail were a part of the Club’s Gamebird Program for many years.  Members bought and raised day-old chicks to maturity and released them into suitable habitats.  On average, F&S released 750 quail each year.  Today, we no longer have our own facilities to raise birds.  Instead, we purchase mature chukars for release into suitable habitat.

Brunson Habitat Project.  In 1990, Field & Stream leased a portion of the Dan Brunson farm.  The 22 acres were mostly brushy, treed land--good pheasant habitat.  Brunson cleared and cultivated 5 acres to various grains and irrigated the crops throughout the summer, then left the grain to provide winter feed.

                                                                                                                        
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Canada Geese were transplanted to the valley.  Club members coordinated with DFW and land owners to set wooden nesting tubs at appropriate sites along the river to encourage the birds to stay.  Today the birds are a familiar site.

Canal Rescue project involves installing escape grids in the cement-lined irrigation canals.  Working in cooperation with Kittitas County Reclamation District, members identify locations where deer and elk become trapped and drown in the canals, then they build and install the grids.   Statistics kept during the first few years of the program showed grids reduced fatalities by more than half.

Cascade Field & Stream and Kittitas County Field & Stream partnered up on several occasions to protect wildlife and habitat, including halting polluting of Yakima River and protecting Wenas-Taneum elk herd.

Children's Activity Museum.  Over the years, Field & Stream has sponsored several outdoor-themed rooms.  In 2006 we contributed to the museum's major renovation of the permanent "Outdoors" area.

Chukars are the major part of the Club’s Gamebird Program.  In the past, members bought and raised day-old chicks to maturity and released them into suitable habitats.  On average, F&S released 1,500 chukars each year.  Today, we no longer have our own facilities to raise birds.  Instead we purchase mature chukars from respected game farms.  Members transport and release up to 800 chukars each year.

Chukar Run Banquet is the major fundraiser the Club holds each year (our other one is Hilltop Parking).  Beginning in 1987 club members raised day-old chicks to maturity for its Gamebird Program and the banquet was the major source of funds for the project.  During those 12 years, members raised and released thousands of chukars, pheasants and quail.  Today, the Club purchases mature chukars, and the Chukar Run Banquet remains the source of funds for this program. 

Columbia River Coalition.  F&S joined the coalition to protect the Hanford Reach, the last free flowing stretch of the Columbia River, as a National Wild and Scenic River.

CORT.  Crime Observation and Reporting Training was begun by
"Eyes In the Woods," a non-profit organization aimed at protecting wildlife and wild lands from abuse by creating a network of trained citizens willing to report resource crimes.  During CORT, WDFW Enforcement Officers teach citizens how to recognize the most common crimes, what details to note and how to report the incident.  In 2004 we began hosting several CORT classes each year.

"Cougarwise."  Walter Strom Middle School eighth graders learn about cougars, their habits and habitat.  Participating in collaring and tracking the animals, the students learned the effects of people feeding deer, the cougars prey.  Field & Stream sponsored a meeting where the upper county students presented their findings and advised against feeding deer.

                                                                                                                           
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Dan Caspar Memorial Fund.  Dan was an avid outdoorsman and in his memory family and friends established the Fund to aid gamebirds in the valley.  It was an honor for the Club to receive the monies and purchase several hundred chukars, which Dan’s family and friends released.

Deer. 
Members aided WDFW capture and collar 13 deer on the Bud Dunning Ranch in Wilson Creek Canyon.  Through this effort, WDFW tracked migration routes, learned habitat and forage preferences, computed harvest rates and estimated populations.

Devil's Gulch.  Field & Stream was instrumental in curtailing the aerial logging on this extremely sensitive and scenic area.  Through meetings with the Wenatchee National Forest supervisor, the Club assisted in this area being designated as "Managed for Wildlife."

Durr Road Clean Up. Located on the LT Murray Wildlife and Recreation Area, the Durr Road shooting area is heavily used and some don’t abide WDFW’s “Pack It Out” campaign, which asks recreationists to “pack out” whatever they may bring onto public lands.  As part of our anti-litter program and our aim to keep public lands open to the public, we clean up trash left by irresponsible shooters.  Our first clean up was in 1999 and has become an annual event with club members, families, and friends joining the effort and cleaning up an average of two tons each year. 

                                                                                                                        
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Elk panels and elk fences protect farmers’ and ranchers’ haystacks from marauding elk.  In order to foster a better relationship between sportsmen and farmers, the Club worked for many years with WDFW and farmers to protect their livelihood.  We donated funds to purchase elk panels and encouraged WDFW to complete the elk fence.  Today the Big Game Management Roundtable is a strong force in resolving the elk depredation issue and we enthusiastically support their work.

Elk Heights rezoning.  F&S opposed rezoning of the Elk Heights area adjacent to the LT Murray wildlife area based on the hazards to elk and deer.  With commercially zoned areas within 10 miles there wasn’t sufficient cause to support the rezone effort.

Ellensburg Chamber of Commerce.  The Club set up an advisory group at the Chamber to assist outside hunters, telling them where they could hunt, the best places to hunt, and encouraging them to foster good hunter-farmer relations.  The Club also donated $1,000 toward the purchase of the Driver's House, today's Chamber of Commerce, Ellensburg Rodeo, and US Forest Service offices.

Ellensburg High School Environmental Club.  We were happy to contribute to the students efforts to raise funds to begin a WDFW "Salmon In the Classroom" project in their school.

Eyes In the Woods.  This non-profit organization is protecting wildlife and wild lands from abuse by creating a network of trained citizens willing to report resource crimes.  During Crime Observation and Reporting Training, WDFW Enforcement Officers teach citizens how to recognize the most common crimes, what details to note and how to report the incident.  In 2004 we began hosting several CORT classes each year.

                                                                                                                              
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Farmer-wildlife conflicts.  From the outright purchase of barriers to protect hay to extensive contact with WDFW, F&S supports valley farmers and ranchers to resolve elk damage problems.  The Big Game Management Roundtable is now the lead in resolving these issues and has F&S support.

Fiorito Ponds were bought by WDFW with the help of Kittitas County Field & Stream, whose members donated $2,000 for the purchase.   These lakes are some of the area’s most heavily fished.   Many enjoy parking their RVs for the entire day at the site.

Firearms Safety Course.  Safety, ethical hunting, and good sportsmanship have been taught in organized classes long before today's Hunter Ed Classes.  For nearly seven decades the Club has taught "hunter education" in some form.

Free Fishing Weekends.  During this WDFW no-license-needed fishing weekend, members set up a booth at Fio Rito Lake to share techniques in everything from knot tying to cleaning the catch.  Club members are happy to introduce this great sport to new anglers every year.

4-H groups aided Field & Stream Club members in caring for the chicks we were raising for our Gamebird Program.

                                                                                                                             
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Game Farm.  Members assisted the State Game Farm on various occasions.  In later years, Club members fixed up the abandoned facility for its own gamebird raising program.

Game Management Program.  
As early as 1945, Field & Stream stressed to the Department of Game the importance of developing a Game Management Program to ensure the public use of state owned lands did not irreparably harm the wildlife on the lands, specifically big game. 

Gamebirds. 
Since beginning in 1987, the Club's Gamebird Programs have released more than 45,000 chukars, pheasants and quail.  Our efforts improve hunting opportunities and help maintain wild populations.

Gamebird Program. 
In 1986 two Club members raised 250 chukar and pheasants at their private homes.  In  1987 the Club received permission to use the abandoned State Game Farm facilities and began an intense gamebird program to replenish populations decimated by the harsh 85-86 winter.  After extensive work to repair the pens and brooders, the club purchased 1,500 day-old chukars and 1,000 pheasant chicks. Five teams of 4-5 people each worked in one-week rotations caring for the birds and maintaining the facilities.  Though hunters and winter kill took a share, some of the Club's banded birds were seen the following year.  The program was a success and members continued raising chukars, pheasants and quail for many years.  Some years 4-H groups took a week rotation during the summer to help the effort.   Today, we no longer raise chicks.  Instead, we purchase mature chukars from reputable game farms and release them into suitable habitats throughout the county.  And, for many years we assisted WDFW in releasing state-raised pheasants.

Garrison Spring was in danger of being obliterated by cattle.  Funded by a Wallace Grant, members securely fenced the immediate soggy area of the spring to prevent it from being destroyed and diverted a portion of the water to a trough for livestock and wildlife.  Riparian habitat restoration benefits all wildlife of an area.

Go Play Outside is a WDFW youth initiative aimed at encouraging youth interest and participation in outdoor activities.   As a member of the Washington Wildlife Coalition, F&S supports youth recreation activities across the state.

                                                                                                                        
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Hanford Reach is the 51-mile segment of the Columbia River flowing through the Hanford Nuclear Reservation.  The Club joined the Columbia River Coalition to protect this last, free-flowing stretch which retains many of the characteristics of the river as it existed prior to the construction of dams.  F&S promoted it be a unit of the National Wild and Scenic River System.

Hansen Canyon.  Members install cisterns in Hansen Canyon area Firing Range.

Highline Canal.  In 1946, the Club contacted the State Game Department to ask what action they contemplated in conjunction with the Reclamation District to prevent deer and elk from drowning the Highline Canal.  Years later Club members began the Canal Rescue project to aid wildlife.

Hilltop Parking is our other fundraiser (the Chukar Run Banquet is the big one).  Working in conjunction with the Rodeo Board, the Club manages parking and rodeo viewing from atop Craig’s Hill.  RVers roll in for the weekend and other spectators come on foot to view the events from this unique vantagepoint.  The Club and Rodeo Board share the funds earned and our proceeds support our many outstanding programs.

Hunter Education Classeshave been a project of the Club for many years.  Supporting WDFW efforts to teach ethical and safe hunting is an important task of the Club.  Several members became Certified Instructors and donate their time and skills to teach classes locally.  The tradition continues today with volunteer certified instructors teaching several classes each year in Kittitas.

                                                                                                                           
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I-90.   The Club requested State Highway Department erect an 8-foot cyclone fence on the west side of the new I-90 between Cle Elum and Taneum canyon as a drift fence for big game. 

Internships. 
Big Game Management Roundtable interns gain on-the-job experience while pursuing a degree in wildlife research or management.  We’re proud to have assisted BGMR complete its important work and aid a young CWU student by funding an intern position for the group.

Joe Watt Canyon.  During the harsh winter of 85-86, members volunteered every day helping WDFW feed the elk and deer driven from the mountains by early onset of winter in mid November.  Joe Watt was the site for 1969 LT Murray Area Dedication ceremonies and the Club sponsored a BBQ picnic for the 600 attendees.

John Wayne Trail. 
Working with State Parks rangers, Field & Stream members supported creation of the park and worked to enhance habitat along the trail.  The Club turned several dozen apple juice barrels into gamebird feeders and placed them along the trail to support gamebirds (after hunting seasons were over).  The Paul Hart Memorial fund greatly supported the Club's efforts.

Junior Conservation Camp
at Orcas Island.   The Club  regularly sponsored a boy to attend the camp each year.  Today the camp is called  Washington State Youth Conservation Camp and we continue sponsoring campers.

                                                                                                                           
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Keep Washington Green.  The Club supported this organization for many years to improve areas throughout Washington State.

Knudson Ranch
(a portion) was offered for sale and WDFW and RMEF worked together on the sale.   When RMEF needed an appraisal to begin its involvement, Field & Stream donated $1,500 to get the ball rolling.  RMEF and F&S encouraged WDFW to make the purchase as an important elk habitat addition to the adjacent LT Murray area; however, it was RMEF that ultimately purchased the property and protected it from development.  It is important to note that the Knudson’s wanted the land saved for elk, and they accepted less than commercial value to ensure it would not be developed.

Life Member Scholarship is given annually to an area high school senior who will be earning a degree in habitat, fish or wildlife management.   Field & Stream is pleased to assist a young man or woman pursue a field of study that will benefit wildlife and habitat.

Litter has no place in the life of responsible recreationists.  Club members pick up litter whenever they are outdoors.  F&S organized the first Yakima River Clean Up.  Members patrolled Mattoon when it was having an extensive littering problem.  After the '66 hunting season, members cleaned up several camps left littered.  The Club’s annual Durr Road Clean Up removes an average of 4,000 lbs of litter from the LT Murray Wildlife and Recreation Area each year.  Join WDFW’s “Pack It Out” campaign and take out whatever you haul onto public lands. 

LT Murray Wildlife and Recreation Area is a tremendous asset to our valley.  Field & Stream was actively involved in the purchase of the 100,000 acre High Valley Ranch.  More than 600 people attended the Dedication Ceremony and the Club sponsored the BBQ picnic that followed.  We are very proud the area is available for everyone to enjoy hiking, wildlife watching, hunting, target practice, and other recreating.

                                                                                                                              
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Manastash.  Field & Stream and the local Pheasants Forever chapter joined to improve a portion of the area's habitat for pheasants.

Mattoon once had an excessive littering problem.  Club members conducted litter patrols to ensure the pond would remain open for those who did not disrespect the area.

McCabe Lake (Helen McCabe State Park).  In the 90s, Field & Stream entered a commitment with Washington State Parks and WDFW to maintain the park for public fishing and members constructed the fence and parking area of McCabe Lake.  We continue the commitment with litter patrols and recently assisted with replacing barbed wire fencing to improve handicap access to the lake.

Morgan Middle School.  We were happy to contribute toward their "Salmon In the Classroom" project when students needed to raise funds to purchase a chiller to keep the salmon tank a chilly 42 degrees.

                                                                                                                           
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Naneum.  Our Lands Use Committee is diligently working to ensure the private-public checkerboard ownership of the Naneum becomes all public.  In a landmark deal, the private owner is cooperating with state agencies.

Naneum Watershed.
  When stream silting was damaging fish habitat, WDFW proposed closing many roads in this highly used area.  Field & Stream objected to the closures, contending the newly built road used by the timber company was primarily responsible, and asked the Department to review road use and maintain public access to the area.

North Central Washington Sportsmen Council.  Joined the council in 1966 to represent area sportsmen on a regional level and provide a stronger voice to the state council.

                                                                                                                                 
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Paul Hart Memorial Fund.  Paul Hart Sr. was a driving force behind the creation and naming of The John Wayne Trail.  The Field & Stream Club was honored to be given Memorial Fund monies to enhance the pheasant habitat and place gamebird feeders along portions of the John Wayne Trail.

Pheasants are a part of the Club’s Gamebird Program.  For many years, members raised day-old chicks to maturity and released them into suitable habitats.  On average, F&S released 1,200 pheasants each year.  Today, we no longer have our own facilities to raise birds.  For several years we assisted WDFW and the CRCC Pheasant Farm with pheasant releases.  Members transported and released several hundred pheasants each year.

Pheasant Habitat.  Pheasants are drawn to grain fields bordered by fence rows with patches of heavy cover.  Bigger farms and more efficient methods have all but destroyed pheasant habitat.  With the Brunson Habitat Project, the Club set out to provide a place for them.  In 1990, Field & Stream leased a portion of the Brunson farm on Riverbottom Road.  The 22 acres were mostly brushy, treed land--good pheasant habitat.  Brunson cleared and cultivated 5 acres to various grains and irrigated the crops throughout the summer, then left the grain to provide winter feed.  Field & Stream posted the area for no hunting and planted some birds from its own program to provide brood stock.   Club members also improved pheasant habitat at Manastash and along the John Wayne Trail.  

Pheasant Rescue.  Some time ago, the Game Department seized 1,200 pheasants from an illegal game farm operation.  At the time, the Club’s gamebird program involved raising day-old chicks, so we had facilities available to care for these birds.  All the birds where quite ill, and members worked around the clock caring for the sickest ones which had lost their feathers.

Plum Creek, the logging subsidiary of Burlington Northern Railroad, began massive clear cutting on its 150,000 acres within Kittitas County and the Club was extremely vocal in its opposition.   Citing the critical harm to the habitat and wildlife, F&S lobbied the company to use the Alpine Lakes Management Plan on their own property.

Pollution.  Working with Cascade Field & Stream, the Club intervened on many occasions when pollutants such as, sewage, coal mine waste, silage, and factory waste, were being spilled or deliberately dumped into the Yakima River and Wilson Creek.

Predator Drives.   Magpie predation harmed gamebird populations such that several years the Club, in cooperation with the Department of Game, paid a bounty on the birds.  In 1944 birds were trapped and released with a "coupon" redeemable by the hunter for a War Bond.

Public Service Award.  WDFW highly praised Kittitas County Field & Stream Club and presented its Public Service Award to us for our long-standing service and superior efforts raising donations for game feeding, helping feed elk and deer, cleaning up elk-damaged Wanapum State park, and feeding birds and game throughout the valley.

                                                                                                                              
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Rabanco Hazardous Waste Incinerator.  The Club was extremely vocal against this incinerator proposed for placement across the Columbia River.

RIDGE.  Field & Stream supported this group's efforts for curtail Plum Creek's 1980s timber harvest in the upper county.   The group contended that the rate of harvest was not sustainable and would ultimately damage the area's economy when harvesting had to end.
 

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation. 
When RMEF needed an appraisal to begin its involvement to purchase a portion of the Knudson Ranch, Field & Stream donated $1,500 to get the ball rolling.  RMEF and the Club encouraged WDFW to make the purchase as an important elk winter habitat addition to the adjacent LT Murray area; however, it was RMEF that ultimately purchased the property and protected it from development.  It is important to note that the Knudson’s wanted the land saved for elk and they accepted less than commercial value to ensure it would not be developed.  Kittitas County and Cascade Field & Stream Clubs worked together to establish the local RMEF chapter.

Roden Trophy was presented to the Club in 1950 by Walt Roden, a regular member and ardent rifleman.  The trophy was awarded annually to the Field & Stream Club member winning the Roden Trophy Shoot.  The course of fire included 20 shots kneeling and 20 shots standing in NRA approved positions.

Rotary Pavilion.  Field & Stream donated a bench at the downtown pavilion in memory of Floyd Wayne, outdoorsman and club member.

Ryegrass Landfill.  The Club was an extremely vocal opponent to this proposed landfill east of Ellensburg.

                                                                                                                               
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Saddle Mountain.  The Club recommended this area be included in the study reviewing Hanford Reach as a National Wild and Scenic River.

Sage Hens.  Club supports local potato farms and protects sage hens by recommending an open season in a limited area where the hens are damaging the farmers crops. 


Salmon In The Classroom.  In 2005 Morgan Middle School wanted to participate in this WDFW program and Field & Stream was happy to help.  They had a 55-gal tank, the salmon eggs were here, but they needed a chiller (to keep the tank a chilly 42 degrees).  Always interested in getting kids connected to the outdoors, the Club donated toward the purchase.  In 2006 we donated to the Ellensburg High School Environmental Club to get their own project started.  We hope to see many salmon fry released from the program in years to come.

Skookumchuck.  In a multi-phase acquisition, major portions of the Skookumchuck are becoming public property.  Our Lands Use Committee was a driving force behind this amazing deal.

Soil Bank.  The Club placed 18.26 acres of its leased property into the Soil Bank as a Conservation Bird Refuge.

Sorenson’s Pond.  At one time F&S leased the pond to provide a Kids’ Fishing Hole.

Snoqualmie and Wenatchee National Forests.  Club members worked extensively to guard big game population in these areas when cattle grazing reduced their habitat.

South Central Washington Sports Council.  Club joined Yakima, Benton and Klickitat county groups in 1947 and formed the council to deal with local issues and give the entire area a stronger voice at the Washington State Sports Council.

Special Award.  In 1973 the Game Department presented Kittitas County Field & Stream Club a Special Award for Outstanding Firearm Training.  The Club continues teaching Hunter Education Classes to promote safety, ethical hunting and sportsmanship.

Spring Rehabilitation.  Members worked on a project improving springs between Manastash and Robinson Canyon.

Stream Pollution Commission.  In the 40s and 50s polluting the branch of Wilson Creek which flows through Ellensburg was a regular problem.  The Club intervened where possible and notified the Commission on other occasions.

                                                                                                                            
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Table Mountain is crucial to deer and elk, especially for fawning and calving.  When an ORV park was planned, the Club opposed it as a serious disruption to the big game of the area.  Available Forest Service roads provided ample recreation areas for ORVs and further harassment of wildlife of Table Mountain would be irresponsible.

Tahoma Chapter Backcountry Horsemen of Washington rode 100 miles over Cascades from Renton to Ellensburg to appear in the Rodeo.  Field & Stream donated use of our club facilities and property to pasture their horses during their stay.  BCHW is a vocal group for keeping public lands open to recreation.

Taneum Lake.  Members sink brush in the lake to improve fish habitat in 1968.

Tjossem's Mill Pond. 
Club members worked to acquire lands and develop means to keep waterbirds in the valley and petitioned Department of Game to purchase this pond and maintain as a permanent game refuge for migratory birds.

Trap and Rifle Shooting was a major club activity for many years.  Today's Ellensburg Trap and Skeet Club was once part of the Field & Stream Club.

Turkeys.  Field & Stream has supported efforts of the National Wild Turkey Federation to transplant turkeys in suitable habitat throughout the valley. 

                                                                                                                                 
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U.S. Soil Conservation Service and the Club cooperated on a reseeding program. 

Wallace Grants.  David and Patsy Wallace donated a large portion of their estate to WDFW to support a grant program aimed at improving bird habitat.  The Club has proudly received several such grants and rehabilitated riparian areas.

Walter Strom Middle School "Cougarwise" program.  Eighth graders learn about cougars, their habits and habitat.  Participating in collaring and tracking the animals, the students learned the effects of people drawing deer--a cougar's prey--into their yards by feeding.  Field & Stream sponsored a meeting where the upper county students presented their findings and advised against feeding deer.

Wanapum State Park.  The harsh winter of 85-86 drove elk into Wanapum State Park for the first time. When Park Rangers discovered elk had damaged over 100 trees by eating the bark, Field & Stream worked with WDFW to prevent more damage by setting up a feeding station at Getty's Cove to draw the elk out.  The following Spring, 25 club members brought chainsaws, pickups and other tools to help Park Rangers cut down and haul out 79 dead trees in one day.  Club efforts ensured the campgrounds were safe and helped Park personnel get started on a replanting program right away.

Washington State Sports Council.  Club regularly sent a representative to the WSSC meetings with input regarding hunting seasons and topics relevant to Kittitas County.  Club still sends a representative to state Fish & Wildlife Commission meetings.

Washington State Youth Conservation Camp.  The Pierce County Sportsmen's Club has held these boys' and girls' camps for many years.  Campers spend a week at Moran State Park on Orcas Island, the largest of Washington's San Juan Islands, where they have a wide variety of outdoor experiences.  Field & Stream is proud to sponsor kids from Kittitas County to attend the annual camp.

Washington Wildlife Coalition,an affiliated group of Washington Wildlife Federation, is a state-wide group of non-profit organizations united to implement the WDFW “Go Play Outside” effort directed at youth and aspiring outdoor recreationists.  The Coalition intends to increase ethical and responsible outdoor recreation and opportunities through promotion of outdoor skills; the proper management of fish, wildlife, habitat; and the conservation mindset.  Through membership and donations, Field & Stream has supported the Coalitions many fishing events, archery camps, and more each year.

Water tanks and guzzlers on LT Murray required maintenance and the Club helped WDFW by monitoring them.

WDFW.   Though a rocky relationship at times, Club members have a long association of assisting the Department of Fish & Wildlife.  Efforts include habitat restoration, feeding game, bighorn surveys, elk classification counts, check station operation, litter clean up, waterfowl surveys, upland bird surveys, deer tagging, and more. 

Wenatchee and Snoqualmie National Forests.  Club members worked extensively to guard big game population in these areas when cattle grazing reduced their habitat.

Wilson Creek Canyon.  Members aided WDFW to capture and collar 13 deer on the Bud Dunning Ranch.  Through this effort, WDFW tracked migration routes, learned habitat and forage preferences, computed harvest rates and estimated populations.

Wood Duck
nest boxes.  Members built and installed boxes to help them thrive.

Whiskey Dick Creek.  Working with WDFW, members have planted hundreds of willows, cottonwood, aspen and dogwood, and installed gabions to transform a barren gully into a suitable habitat for beavers to slow the stream, raise the water table and vastly improve the area for all wildlife.  According to WDFW, beavers once thrived in the area, their dams doing for free what government dams do for many millions of dollars--store water. 

White Spring was in danger of being obliterated by cattle.   Funded by a Wallace Grant, members securely fenced the immediate soggy area of the spring to prevent it from being destroyed and diverted a portion of the water to a trough.  Trough overflow was led into a rocky stream bed, where cattle and wildlife would not create problems by wallowing.  A check of the area the following day showed deer had used the tank that night. 
Riparian habitat restoration benefits all wildlife of an area.

Wilson Creek. 
In the 40s and 50s polluting the branch of Wilson Creek which flows through Ellensburg was a regular problem.  The Club intervened where possible and notified the Stream Pollution Commission on other occasions.  In later years, Club members volunteered at a Kiwanis organized effort to improve Wilson Creek habitat.  Volunteers planted red twig dogwood to provide shade and protect against bank erosion.

Winter Wildlife Feeding.  The Club’s annual program to support wildlife during harsh winters has been a success for many years, particularly during the ‘85-’86 winter.  The community banded together during this very severe time.  Club members volunteered every day at elk feeding stations, filling bird feeders, stocking its winter wildlife feed bins, and much more.

Woodhouse Ponds.  Field & Stream members helped WDFW clean up rubbish and brush from this area.

WWII.  In 1944 the Club requested the State Sports Council conduct "no open season on cow elk in Kittitas County for the duration of the war, to protect our elk so that our boys in the service may have some game when they get home."

Yakima River Maps
are published by the Club to aid recreationists rafting, fishing, boating, etc on the Yakima River.  Our maps list access points, river hazards, picnic and camping areas and other information to improve your outdoor experience.  We printed the 3rd Edition the summer of 2005.

Youth Angler Education.  First effort to offer fishing instruction to beginning anglers consisted of a 2-day course held summer 2006.  Classroom time covered choosing and handling gear, how fish use their senses, fish behavior and more.  Field time offered hands-on fly fishing casting and retrieving instruction.  Support from The Evening Hatch Fly Shop, Pautzke Bait Company and WDFW contributed to our success. 
                                                                                                                           
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